Finding the Fountain of Youth for Catalysts

Pitt Engineers Develop a New Method to Extend the Catalytic Lifetime of Nanoparticles

Eco-Village Seeks to Recirculate Pittsburgh’s Waste

Engineering undergrads hope to make Pittsburgh more sustainable through a community circular economy that optimizes waste management

Modeling a Circular Economy for Electronic Waste

Pitt Engineers Propose Solutions for E-Waste Recycling Fraud

Capturing the Huge Impacts of Tiny Organisms

Pitt Chemical Engineer Receives $315K from NSF to Replicate Microbial Systems

Storing the Sun’s Energy

ChemE’s James McKone will collaborate with small businesses to advance renewable energy and improve storage using solar-powered technology

A Better Way to Separate Isotopes

New Research in Nature Communications Introduces Porous Carbon Material to Separate Heavier Isotope Gases

Breathing Easier with a Better Tracheal Stent

Pitt Researchers Demonstrate First Successful Use of Biodegradable Magnesium-alloy Stent for Pediatric Patients

Chemical & Petroleum Engineering

The Chemical and Petroleum Engineering department at the University of Pittsburgh Swanson School of Engineering was established in 1910, making it the first department for petroleum engineering in the world. Today, our department has over 40 expert faculty (tenure/tenure-stream/joint/adjunct), a host of dedicated staff, more than 20 state-of-the-art laboratories and learning centers, and education programs that enrich with strong fundamentals and hands-on experience.

Chemical engineering is concerned with processes in which matter and energy undergo change. The range of concerns is so broad that the chemical engineering graduate is prepared for a variety of interesting and challenging employment opportunities. Chemical engineers with strong background in sciences are found in management, design, operations, and research. Chemical engineers are employed in almost all industries, including food, polymers, chemicals, pharmaceutical, petroleum, medical, materials, and electronics. Since solutions to energy, environmental, and food problems must surely involve chemical changes, there will be continued demands for chemical engineers in the future.

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