Pitt | Swanson Engineering
Pitt ChemE Professor Awarded Sloan Research Fellowship
Susan Fullerton, PhD, Bicentennial Board of Visitors Faculty Fellow and assistant professor of chemical engineering at the University of Pittsburgh’s Swanson School of Engineering

PITTSBURGH (Feb. 12, 2020) — Susan Fullerton, PhD, Bicentennial Board of Visitors Faculty Fellow and assistant professor of chemical engineering at the University of Pittsburgh’s Swanson School of Engineering, has been selected as a 2020 Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow in Chemistry. The highly competitive award is given to outstanding early-career scientists from the U.S. and Canada.

The two-year, $75,000 fellowship recognizes researchers’ unique potential to make substantial contributions to their field. Fullerton’s fellowship will further her research on two-dimensional materials for next-generation electronics.  These two-dimensional materials can be thought of as a piece of paper – if the paper were only a single molecule thick.  Fullerton’s group uses ions to control charge in these molecularly thin sheets for application in memory and logic.  Fullerton is the 12th Pitt faculty member to receive the Chemistry Fellowship since 1970 

“This Fellowship speaks to Susan’s groundbreaking research in electronics, and how she’s used her training in the chemical sciences to impact this field; it’s an honor that is well-deserved,” says Steven Little, PhD, William Kepler Whiteford Professor and Department Chair of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering. 

The Sloan Research Fellowships are awarded annually to 126 researchers in the areas of chemistry, computation and evolutionary molecular biology, computer science, economics, mathematics, neuroscience, ocean sciences and physics. The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, founded in 1934 and named for the former president and CEO of the General Motors Corporation, makes grants to support research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics and economics.

 

Maggie Pavlick, 2/12/2020

Contact: Maggie Pavlick