Pitt | Swanson Engineering

Welcome

Industrial engineering (IE) is about choices - it is the engineering discipline that offers the most wide-ranging array of opportunities in terms of employment, and it is distinguished by its flexibility. While other engineering disciplines tend to apply skills to very specific areas, Industrial Engineers may be found working everywhere: from traditional manufacturing companies to airlines, from distribution companies to financial institutions, from major medical establishments to consulting companies, from high-tech corporations to companies in the food industry.

View our Spring 2018 course schedule for undergraduate and graduate students.

The BS in industrial engineering program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET (http://www.abet.org). To learn more about Industrial Engineering’s Undergraduate Program ABET Accreditation, click here

Our department is the proud home of Pitt's Center for Industry Studies, which supports multidisciplinary research that links scholars to some of the most important and challenging problems faced by modern industry.

OPEN FACULTY POSITIONS (Fall 2018)


Oct
30
2017

IE Tenure Faculty

Industrial, Open Positions

The Department of Industrial Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh invites applications for one or more tenure-track faculty positions. Candidates at all levels will be considered, subject to appropriate qualifications. Applicants must have strong methodological training in one or more traditional areas of industrial engineering and be motivated by impactful engineering problems in areas such as operations, supply chains, healthcare, energy and manufacturing. We are particularly interested in candidates who have the ability to conduct cutting-edge, interdisciplinary research in fields such as data analytics, machine learning, cybermanufacturing and cyberphysical systems. For junior candidates, our primary search criterion is research potential. Senior candidates must have established an outstanding research record commensurate with rank. All candidates should have evidence of, or potential for, teaching excellence. Candidates from underrepresented groups are particularly encouraged to apply.The Department of Industrial Engineering is currently comprised of 19 full-time faculty members and enjoys an outstanding reputation in a wide variety of research areas. The department maintains vibrant programs at the undergraduate, masters and doctoral levels, offers excellent laboratory facilities, and benefits from many contacts with regional and national corporations. Additional information about the department can be found at www.engineering.pitt.edu/industrial.Applicants should e-mail a curriculumvitae, representative publications, and a list of at least three professional references to facultysearch2017@ie.pitt.edu. Review of applications will begin immediately and will continue until the position is filled.

Oct
26
2017

Pitt and UPMC Researchers Collaborate to Save More Organs for Transplants

Industrial

PITTSBURGH (October 26, 2017) … Each year, the United States suffers an extreme shortage of organ donations, with only a quarter of patients in need receiving a transplant. Many transplantable organs are lost when a donor’s heart fails, and the organs stop receiving vital blood flow. Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh can potentially double the amount of successful organ donations by developing a novel stent to maintain blood flow to organs, even during the donor’s final heart beats.The National Institutes of Health awarded a four-year, $1.3 million R01 grant to a University of Pittsburgh research collaboration between the Department of Surgery and the Department of Industrial Engineering. The study titled “An Organ Perfusion Stent as an Alternative to Surgery in Donor Organ Recovery” will develop a dual chamber organ perfusion stent made of smart material to direct selective blood flow during transplant surgeries. Leading the study are Principal Investigators Bryan W. Tillman, assistant professor in the Division of Vascular Surgery at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC); Youngjae Chun, associate professor of industrial engineering and bioengineering; and Sung Kwon Cho, associate professor of mechanical engineering and materials science at Pitt’s Swanson School of Engineering. The stent will isolate visceral arteries—which supply blood to many major organs—without disturbing the heart. To make the stent, the research team will use a superelastic material with a flexible shape memory effect called nitinol, or nickel titanium.“The shape memory behavior of nitinol is critical for endovascular devices such as stents, filters, and occluders, because at low temperatures, nitinol can easily be collapsed, inserted into a catheter, and delivered into the body,” said Dr. Chun. “Once inside, the body heat will change nitinol’s properties to be superplastic without any actuation force, which is really beneficial for a wide-range of catheter-based procedures.” Venous dual chamber organ perfusion stent prototype. Note: somematerials in the design were purchased from Cook Medical The organ perfusion stent can be inserted by a clinician into the femoral artery after the delivery of a guide wire and a catheter. This small puncture or “needlestick” method allows clinicians to maintain selective blood flow to certain organs without disrupting others’ natural functioning. The much larger organ stent in its compressed state can be delivered to the desired organ and deployed.  “We can target the kidneys, pancreas, and liver,” said Dr. Chun. “Transplants involving any major organs connected to the main aorta will be able to benefit from this new technology.”Other collaborators include William C. Clark, professor of mechanical engineering and materials science at Pitt; Ryan Dzadony, associate director of the UPMC School of Perfusion; Anthony J. Demetris, Starzl Professor of Liver and Transplant Pathology at UPMC; and Amit Tevar, associate professor of surgery at the Thomas E. Starzl Transplant Institute. ###
Matt Cichowicz, Communications Writer
Oct
25
2017

Visiting Scholar Sanjeev Goyal Wraps up Yearlong Collaboration with Pitt and American Red Cross

Industrial

PITTSBURGH (October 25, 2017) … The University of Pittsburgh hosted Sanjeev Goyal, assistant professor at the YMCA University of Science and Technology in Faridabad, India, as a postdoctoral scholar focusing on the use of predictive models in disaster response. Dr. Goyal has been working under the supervision of Louis Luangkesorn, assistant professor of industrial engineering at Pitt’s Swanson School of Engineering, to predict the demands for food and shelter services following major floods.“In the early days of a disaster, the deployment of state and national resources into the disaster area is often delayed pending a request for resources from local agencies,” said Dr. Goyal. “The delay can be lengthened because local personnel are conducting first response operations. However, it may be possible to initiate movement of resources into an affected region if an estimate of the needs can be made, then direct specific resources as local agencies make specific requests when preliminary assessments are completed. Predictive models promise to provide these types of estimates.” To develop a predictive model, Dr. Goyal and Dr. Luangkesorn are using demographic, physical, and historical data that is readily available outside of the disaster area on the first day of a disaster. Demographic data is represented by the Social Vulnerability Index maintained by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Physical damage impacts are represented by the National Weather Service Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service historical and current flood gauge data. Historical data is available from American Red Cross damage assessment and feeding and sheltering operations from past major floods. The model seeks to predict the damage to residences and the resulting needs for food and shelter. This prediction can then be used to initiate the assignment of supplies, personnel, logistics, and financial resources to disaster relief. Efforts can be refined as more information is available. Initial results of the model have been used to inform response to floods in summer 2017 in the United States. Further work is intended to prepare the model for use by disaster response agencies in making initial resource requirement estimates in areas impacted by flooding rivers.  Dr. Goyal received support from a University Grants Commission of India for the one-year fellowship, which began October 2016. The work was done with the advice and assistance of Mr. Michael Whitehead, government operations manager at American Red Cross. ###
Louis Luangkesorn, Assistant Professor of Industrial Engineering
Jul
26
2017

Pitt’s Center for Medical Innovation awards three novel biomedical devices with $65,000 total Round-1 2017 Pilot Funding

Bioengineering, Chemical & Petroleum, Industrial

PITTSBURGH (July 26, 2017) … The University of Pittsburgh’s Center for Medical Innovation (CMI) awarded grants totaling $65,000 to three research groups through its 2017 Round-1 Pilot Funding Program for Early Stage Medical Technology Research and Development. The latest funding proposals include a new technology for reducing risk of post-partum uterine hemorrhage, a thermal device for inducing nerve block in pain control, and a system to improve transplanted organ viability.CMI, a University Center housed in Pitt’s Swanson School of Engineering, supports applied technology projects in the early stages of development with “kickstart” funding toward the goal of transitioning the research to clinical adoption. Proposals are evaluated on the basis of scientific merit, technical and clinical relevance, potential health care impact and significance, experience of the investigators, and potential in obtaining further financial investment to translate the particular solution to healthcare.“This is our sixth year of pilot funding,” said Alan D. Hirschman, PhD, CMI Executive Director. “Since our inception, more than $1 million from external funding sources and from the Swanson School of Engineering has been invested in early stage medical technologies. Many of these technologies have the potential to significantly improve the delivery of health care and several new companies have resulted from the program, which has successfully partnered UPMC’s clinicians and surgeons with the Swanson School’s engineering faculty.”AWARD 1: Objective Postpartum Uterine Tone MonitoringFunds development of a new prototype uterine tone measurement device for eventual testing in the clinical setting. The device would evaluate intra-uterine muscle tone for detection of and control of postpartum bleeding.Gerhardt Konig, MDDepartment of Anesthesiology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine Jason Shoemaker, PhDAssistant Professor of Chemical & Petroleum Engineering, University of Pittsburgh Swanson School of EngineeringAWARD 2: Novel Thermal Block Technology to Block Nerve ConductionFor development and preclinical testing of a thermal nerve block device for anesthesia and pain control. Early research in mice shows that the effect can be useful in controlling production and communication of nerve impulses. The award will demonstrate proof of concept to attract additional funding from external competitive grants. Development of a small implantable, wireless controlled, wireless chargeable device to control the electrodes will be a primary goal. The prototype device will then test the pudendal nerve to confirm the nerve block effects. Changfeng Tai, PhD Associate Professor of Urology, University of Pittsburgh School of MedicineAssociate Professor of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh Swanson School of Engineering Christopher Chermansky, MDAssistant Professor of Urology, University of Pittsburgh School of MedicineAssistant Professor of Industrial Engineering, University of Pittsburgh Swanson School of Engineering Bo Zeng, PhD Assistant Professor of Industrial Engineering, University of Pittsburgh Swanson School of Engineering AWARD 3: OrganEvac/Whole Organ Sonothrombolysis DeviceThis award is an equal participation between the Center for Medical Innovation and the Coulter Translational Research Partners II Program at Pitt. The early stage seed grant will demonstrate proof of concept that sonothrombolysis technology can greatly enhance viability of transplanted liver tissue through evaluation of thromboemboli in excised, non-transplantable human liver tissue. Paulo Fontes, MDAssociate Professor of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of MedicineDirector of the Machine Perfusion Program, University of Pittsburgh Medical CenterJohn Pacella, MD, MSAssistant Professor of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, University of Pittsburgh School of MedicineUniversity of Pittsburgh Medical Center Heart and Vascular InstituteFlordeliza Villaneuva, MDVice Chair for Pre-Clinical Research, Department of Medicine and Professor of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, University of Pittsburgh School of MedicineDirector, Center for Ultrasound Molecular Imaging and Therapeutics, University of Pittsburgh Medical CenterAbout the Center for Medical InnovationThe Center for Medical Innovation at the Swanson School of Engineering is a collaboration among the University of Pittsburgh’s Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI), the Innovation Institute, and the Coulter Translational Research Partnership II (CTRP). Established in 2011, CMI promotes the application and development of innovative biomedical technologies to clinical problems; educates the next generation of innovators in cooperation with the schools of Engineering, Health Sciences, Business, and Law; and facilitates the translation of innovative biomedical technologies into marketable products and services. CMI has supported more than 50 early-stage projects through more than $1 million in funding since inception. ###

Jun
6
2017

IE’s Joel Haight Receives ASSE 2016-17 President’s Award for Contributions to Safety Engineering

Industrial

PITTSBURGH, PA (June 6, 2017) … Thomas Cecich, the president of the American Society of Safety Engineers (ASSE), named the University of Pittsburgh’s Joel Haight one of five recipients of the 2016-2017 President’s Award. The annual award recognizes occupational safety and health (OSH) professionals for their “exceptional service and dedication to workplace safety and the OSH profession.”Dr. Haight, associate professor of industrial engineering at Pitt, received the President’s Award for his leadership and commitment to advancing OSH research. As the chair of the research committee for the ASSE Foundation, Dr. Haight developed a research program to help safety professionals stay current with new ideas and emerging technologies. The Foundation recently awarded its first grant totaling $300,000 for a three-year study to a group of researchers at the University of Buffalo. Dr. Haight also received the 2016 ASSE Safety Professional of the Year award for the Engineering Practice Specialty. In addition to his faculty position, he is the director of the safety engineering program at Pitt.About Dr. HaightJoel M. Haight joined the Industrial Engineering Department at the University of Pittsburgh in 2013. In the previous 33 years he served four years as Chief of the Human Factors Branch at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) - National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) at their Pittsburgh Office of Mine Safety and Health Research, where he managed a research branch of 35-40 researchers in the areas of ergonomics, cognitive engineering, human behavior, and training. Dr. Haight also served for nearly 10 years, as an Associate Professor of Energy and Mineral Engineering at the Pennsylvania State University. Dr. Haight worked as a manager and engineer for the Chevron Corporation for 18 years prior to joining the faculty at Penn State. His research interests include health and safety management systems intervention effectiveness measurement and optimization and human performance measurement in automated control system design.He is the editor in chief and contributing author of Handbook of Loss Prevention Engineering published by J.W. Wiley and Sons in 2013 and the Safety Professionals Handbook published by the American Society of Safety Engineers in 2012. In addition, he has published nearly 60 refereed journal articles and conference proceedings.  Dr. Haight is an active member of ASSE, HFES, IISE, and AIHA. He serves as the chair of the research committee for the American Society of Safety Engineers foundation and Board of Trustees member. He is a licensed professional engineer in Pennsylvania and Alabama and certified by the Board of Certified Safety Professionals and the American Board of Industrial Hygienists.About ASSEFounded in 1911, the American Society of Safety Engineers is the world’s oldest professional safety society. ASSE promotes the expertise, leadership, and commitment of its members, while providing them with professional development, advocacy, and standards development. The organization also sets the occupational safety, health, and environmental community’s standards for excellence and ethics. ###
Matt Cichowicz, Communications Writer

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