Pitt | Swanson Engineering

The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh emphasizes educational programs that combine theory with practice in the electrical engineering field. Whether students want a broad understanding of electrical engineering, or want to place specific emphasis on interests like computers, signal processing, power, or electronics, the department offers the education that sparks great careers.





Dec
8
2016

The Virtual Education

Electrical & Computer

PITTSBURGH (December 8, 2016) … Despite exponential advancements in computing and internet technology, the majority of digital devices still rely on human-computer interface to gather and use data. The technology community has been buzzing recently about a new landscape in which devices spend more time interacting with the physical and virtual world than actual users. However, people are not entirely removed from the equation - in fact, more than ever before they will be able to reap the benefits of all this data.Samuel Dickerson, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Pittsburgh’s Swanson School of Engineering, has designed the course “Introduction to Cyber-Physical Systems” to teach students about the emerging field of cyber-physical systems—or what is more commonly referred to as “The Internet of Things” or simply “IoT.” The course will be available to undergraduate students beginning spring 2017.“The Internet of Things is projected to be the next industrial revolution,” said Dickerson. “It’s a new area in itself. Not many universities have an entire course dedicated to it, but we’re going to take a top-to-bottom approach. Students will begin with building and attaching sensors to devices, then be challenged to find effective ways to use the data collected and even develop business plans to look at product markets for their creations.”Many business leaders and publications are projecting the IoT market to be worth more than $1 trillion by 2020. Smart cars, wired homes and wearable devices herald a future in which people have complete connectivity with their devices and the ability to seamlessly share data on demand. However, much of the technology required to make this possibility a reality has not been invented yet.“Now more than ever we require innovation to keep pace with the speed of our imagination,” said Dickerson. “Students that complete Introduction to Cyber-Physical Systems will have a good understanding of the present and future demands of this new industry as well as a concrete understanding of how to turn engineering knowledge into marketable products.”After students acquire an understanding of “IoT” related skills, Dickerson will introduce the “Lean Launchpad” methodology, which teaches entrepreneurial business and product development by encouraging experimentation and hands-on experience. The students will take their technical projects and look for ways to innovate and prototype IoT devices.“More than 200 universities have adopted Lean Launchpad since its inception in 2011,” said Dickerson. “Building off some of the ingenuity in emerging fields, Pitt students are not just going to learn about startups and innovation, they might also leave the class as entrepreneurs.”“Introduction to Cyber Physical Systems” received funding as one of eight teaching proposals selected by the Office of the Provost’s Advisory Council on Instructional Excellence as part of the 2016 Innovation in Education Awards Program. ### Image above: Dr. Dickerson with sophomore David Skrovanek.
Author: Matt Cichowicz, Communications Writer
Dec
1
2016

ECE NTS Assistant Professor

Electrical & Computer, Open Positions

The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) at the University of Pittsburgh (http://www.engineering.pitt.edu/ece) is seeking candidates for a non-tenure stream (NTS) teaching position at the level of assistant professor. The anticipated start date is September 2017. This position will be eligible for consideration for later career promotion and advancement through the NTS evaluation process of the Swanson School of Engineering (SSOE). We seek a person whose primary responsibilities will be undergraduate teaching and mentoring along with education and curriculum development. This faculty member will ideally hold a PhD degree and be capable of teaching courses in both the electrical and computer engineering undergraduate programs. The preferred candidate should possess technical background strength in signal processing, communications, control theory, and/or computer engineering. The ECE Department currently has 27 faculty members and offers B.S., M.S., and PhD degrees in electrical and computer engineering. Current enrollment consists of nearly 500 undergraduate and 200 graduate students. The SSOE just completed a $100 million renovation and redesign of Benedum Engineering Hall with state-of-the-art teaching and research laboratories for ECE. For full consideration, applications must be received by March 3, 2017, although later applications may be considered. Please submit a CV, contact information for four references, plus a letter summarizing your teaching interests and research background, in a single PDF file, to teachingece@pitt.edu. The University of Pittsburgh is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer and does not discriminate on the basis of age, color, disability, gender, gender identity, marital status, national or ethnic origin, race, religion, sexual orientation or veteran status.

teachingece@pitt.edu
Nov
11
2016

ECE Tenure Stream Faculty

Electrical & Computer, Open Positions

The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (http://www.engineering.pitt.edu/ECE/) at the University of Pittsburgh invites applications for three tenure-stream faculty positions at all ranks in the area of computer engineering effective September 1, 2017. Candidates should show strong potential to become leaders or have demonstrated track records in their fields and be able to synergize with current strengths of the department and the Swanson School of Engineering (SSOE) (http://www.engineering.pitt.edu/). Successful candidates must also be committed to high-quality education for a diverse student body at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. This targeted hiring in computer engineering is part of a broader initiative and investment that recognizes the growth of our academic programs in computer engineering by more than 50% in the last five years and synergy with the recently announced school of computing.  The ECE Department boasts internationally recognized programs and award-winning faculty in the areas of (1) Computer Engineering, (2) Biomedical Systems and Signal Processing, (3) Energy and Electric Power Systems and Technologies, and (4) Nano/Micro-Electronics & Photonics. The ECE Department is also home to several research centers including the well-known NSF Center for High-Performance Reconfigurable Computing (CHREC). ECE and SSOE faculty also maintain vibrant collaborations with the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, the Center for Energy, the Peterson Institute for NanoScience and Engineering, the Pittsburgh Supercomputer Center, the Mascaro Center for Sustainable Innovation, the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory, among others. The department currently has 29 faculty members and offers B.S., M.S., and PhD degrees in electrical and computer engineering.  Current enrollment consists of nearly 500 undergraduate and 200 graduate students.  The SSOE just completed a $100 million renovation and redesign of Benedum Engineering Hall with state-of-the-art teaching and research laboratories. As part of its growth, the ECE Department has recently been allotted additional space in Schenley Place, a new research-centric building on Pitt’s campus within walking distance of Benedum Hall, augmenting our additional presence at research facilities in Bakery Square. Exceptional candidates in all areas of computer engineering will be considered.Applications are due by January 9th, 2017, although candidates will continue to be considered until positions are filled. Please submit a CV, research and teaching statements, and contact information for at least three references, all in a single PDF file, to coesearch@pitt.edu. The University of Pittsburgh is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer and does not discriminate on the basis of age, color, disability, gender, gender identity, marital status, national or ethnic origin, race, religion, sexual orientation, or veteran status.

coesearch@pitt.edu
Nov
8
2016

National Academy of Engineering invites ECE's Samuel Dickerson to Frontiers of Engineering Education Symposium

Electrical & Computer

WASHINGTON, DC (November 8, 2016) … The National Academy of Engineering invited 48 innovative engineering faculty members to its eighth annual Frontiers of Engineering Education (FOEE) symposium last month to discuss groundbreaking new approaches to engineering education beginning to take root at universities across the nation.Samuel Dickerson, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Pittsburgh’s Swanson School of Engineering, joined the assembly to discuss his plans to develop innovative course topics and implement new and effective teaching strategies in the classroom. “At the Frontiers of Engineering Education symposium, young faculty members like Sam can learn from their peers and prepare to meet the challenges that arise from constant changes in engineering and society as a whole,” said Mary Besterfield-Sacre, professor of industrial engineering and director of the Swanson School’s Engineering Education Research Center. “Sam has shown outstanding dedication to incorporating new strategies in the classroom, particular to innovation and entrepreneurship and we were excited to have him represent the advancements in engineering education being developed at Pitt.” At the FOEE symposium, Dickerson became a contributing member of the Entrepreneurship and Education Affinity Group interested in incorporating a multidisciplinary approach to engineering education, specifically methods and principles employed by startup businesses to ensure success and growth.“We believed that engineering students should be involved with studying entrepreneurship. The job of an engineer is to make or design something that has value to someone else. That doesn’t necessarily require business savvy, but it is reflected in the entrepreneurial spirit,” said Dickerson.Dickerson’s research interests include biomedical circuits and systems, cyber-physical systems, integrated circuit design and lab-on-chip microsystems. He received his bachelor of science degree in computer engineering and master of science and doctorate in electrical engineering from the University of Pittsburgh. ###
Author: Matt Cichowicz, Communications Writer
Oct
28
2016

Duquesne Light’s Richard Riazzi and Duke Energy’s Lloyd Yates to keynote eleventh annual Electric Power Industry Conference at Pitt

Electrical & Computer

PITTSBURGH (October 28, 2016) … “The Grid in Transformation” is the theme of the 2016 Electric Power Industry Conference, presented by the University of Pittsburgh’s Swanson School of Engineering and its Center for Energy on Monday, November 14 and Tuesday, November 15 at the University Club on Pitt’s Oakland Campus. This year’s keynote speakers are Richard Riazzi, President and CEO of Duquesne Light in Pittsburgh, and Lloyd M. Yates, Executive Vice Present, Customer and Distribution Operations; President Carolinas of Duke Energy in Charlotte, North Carolina. Both are alumni of the University of Pittsburgh. Registration is $149 and includes conference meals. For more information and the full conference schedule visit engineering.pitt.edu/epic or email cfenergy@pitt.edu. Conference sponsorships and corporate exhibit opportunities are also available. “As universities like Pitt partner with corporations and utilities, we’re experiencing a subtle yet steady evolution of our transmission and distribution grid,” noted Gregory Reed, PhD, Conference Chair and Director of Pitt’s Center for Energy and the GRID Institute; Director of the Swanson School’s Electric Power Systems Laboratory; and Professor of Electric Power Engineering. “We’re taking on the economic and technological challenges of modernizing a grid built a century ago, and working together to solve the problems that utilities face with integrating renewable and distributed resources, such as home-based solar installations, as well as addressing other dynamics across the industry. “Rich and Lloyd are both change agents in the industry and understand that power utilities can best evolve by collaborating with research universities like Pitt and private companies to transform the grid for the 21st century.” The first day of EPIC will feature the keynote speakers as well as technical program sessions, a graduate student research symposium and poster session, with an evening networking event. The second day will open with a Grid Modernization Workshop and breakout sessions. Current sponsors include Pitt, the Swanson School of Engineering and the Center for Energy, along with ANSYS, Burns McDonnell, Dominion, Duquesne Light, Eaton, Edison Electric Institute, Mitsubishi Electric, Nayak Corporation, NRG Energy, OPAL-RT Technologies, Pitt-Ohio, Power Analytics Corp., Sargent Electric Corp., and Universal Electric Corp. About Richard Riazzi A 36-year power and natural gas industry veteran, Richard Riazzi currently serves as President and Chief Executive Officer of Duquesne Light Holdings and Duquesne Light Company, a leader in the transmission and distribution of electric energy to more than half a million customers in southwestern Pennsylvania, including downtown Pittsburgh. Riazzi’s six years at Duquesne Light reflect an ongoing focus on customer service and technology improvements.  Consistently among the best utilities in the state in reliability and in the top 10 percent in customer satisfaction nationwide, Duquesne Light, under Riazzi’s leadership, invested significant resources to ensure that its infrastructure – the wires, transformers, substations, poles and other equipment that make up the company’s transmission and distribution system—meets current and future electrical demands.  Most recently, the company replaced separate customer care computer systems with one new, integrated system that will allow customers to better manage their monthly electric use.  An extensive upgrade in its metering infrastructure, started in 2014, will put more information in the hands of customers via an online portal, enabling them to make more informed decisions about their energy consumption.  Looking to the future, Riazzi also has committed more than $1 billion to transmission and distribution infrastructure improvements to ensure a safe, reliable source of electricity for Duquesne Light customers. Prior to joining Duquesne Light, Riazzi spent four years as CEO and General Manager of the Chelan County Public Utility District, a wholesale generator and retail distributor of electric power in the state of Washington.  At Chelan County PUD, Riazzi launched a planning process to bring the community and ratepayers together to steer the utility through a financial downturn. Comprehensive financial policies developed during that time will guide the utility through the foreseeable future by paying down debt, building reserves, and avoiding large rate increases.  He is also credited with leading Chelan County to numerous high rankings in transmission system reliability and overseeing the environmental stewardship around the company’s three hydroelectric projects. Previously, Riazzi held various management positions at Idaho Power and its parent company, IDACORP, Inc., an electric utility that serves approximately 500,000 customers in southwest Idaho and nearby portions of adjoining states.  He also served as President and Chief Executive Officer for IDACORP Energy, L.P., the energy marketing arm of IDACORP, Inc. In his early career, Riazzi spent fifteen years with Equitable Resources Inc. (now operating as EQT Corporation) in various management positions, first with Equitable Gas Company and later with its Energy Resource companies. A native of McKeesport, Pa., Riazzi earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees at the University of Pittsburgh. Mr. Riazzi is an active member of numerous community and industry organizations, including serving on the boards of the Allegheny Conference on Community Development, the United Way of Allegheny County, Junior Achievement of Western PA, the Pauline Auberle Foundation and the Edison Electric Institute (EEI). About Lloyd YatesAs executive vice president of customer and delivery operations for Duke Energy, Lloyd Yates is responsible for all customer-facing operations. In addition, he oversees the company’s electric distribution system, as well as planning for grid investments to enhance reliability and the customer experience. As president of Duke Energy’s Carolinas Region, he has responsibility for the profit/loss, strategic direction and performance of the company’s regulated utilities in North Carolina and South Carolina. Yates has more than 30 years of experience in the energy industry, including the areas of nuclear generation, fossil generation and energy delivery. He previously served as executive vice president of regulated utilities for Duke Energy, where he had responsibility for the company’s utility operations in six states. He also had responsibility for federal government affairs, as well as environmental and energy policy at the state and federal levels. As executive vice president of customer operations for Duke Energy, he led the transmission, distribution, customer services, gas operations and grid modernization functions to approximately 7.2 million electric customers and 500,000 gas customers. Prior to the Duke Energy/Progress Energy merger in July 2012, Yates served as president and chief executive officer for Progress Energy Carolinas. He was promoted to that position in July 2007, after serving for more than two years as senior vice president of energy delivery for Progress Energy Carolinas. Prior to that, he served as vice president of transmission for Progress Energy Carolinas. Yates joined Progress Energy predecessor, Carolina Power & Light, in 1998, and served for five years as vice president of fossil generation. Before joining Progress Energy, he worked for PECO Energy for 16 years in several line operations and management positions. Yates earned a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Pittsburgh and a master's degree in business administration from St. Joseph's University in Philadelphia. He attended the Advanced Management Program at the University of Pennsylvania Wharton School and the Executive Management Program at the Harvard Business School. Yates serves on several community, state and industry boards. In 2014, he was elected president and chairman of the Association of Edison Illuminating Companies. He is also a director for Marsh & McLennan Companies Inc., a global professional services firm. Yates and his wife, Monica, have two daughters. ###

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