Pitt | Swanson Engineering

The Chemical and Petroleum Engineering department at the University of Pittsburgh Swanson School of Engineering was established in 1910, making it the first department for petroleum engineering in the world. Today, our department has over 40 expert faculty (tenure/tenure-stream/joint/adjunct), a host of dedicated staff, more than 20 state-of-the-art laboratories and learning centers, and education programs that enrich with strong fundamentals and hands-on experience.

Chemical engineering is concerned with processes in which matter and energy undergo change. The range of concerns is so broad that the chemical engineering graduate is prepared for a variety of interesting and challenging employment opportunities.

Chemical engineers with strong background in sciences are found in management, design, operations, and research. Chemical engineers are employed in almost all industries, including food, polymers, chemicals, pharmaceutical, petroleum, medical, materials, and electronics. Since solutions to energy, environmental, and food problems must surely involve chemical changes, there will be continued demands for chemical engineers in the future.

Mar
10
2015

Pitt scores in U.S. News Best Graduate Schools Guidebook

All SSoE News, Bioengineering, Chemical & Petroleum, Civil & Environmental, Electrical & Computer, Industrial, MEMS

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH NEWS RELEASE PITTSBURGH- In newly released statistics from U.S. News & World Report , a number of University of Pittsburgh schools and programs have excelled in the Best Graduate Schools 2016 guidebook. Pitt's School of Nursing is ranked no. 5 nationwide in an inaugural annual ranking of nursing schools that offer master's or doctorate programs. In nursing specialties, the school is no. 1 in the category of nurse anesthesia; no. 3 in clinical nurse leader; no. 3 in pediatric, primary care (tie); no. 5 in administration (tie); no. 5 in adult / gerontology, acute care (tie); and no. 5 in psychiatric / mental health, across the lifespan. Pitt's School of Medicine ranks no. 16 in the research category and no. 19 (tie) in the primary care category of the Best Medical Schools ranking. In medical specialties, Pitt is no. 4 in women's health. In new Health disciplines rankings, Pitt's master's and doctorate programs in public health in the Graduate School of Public Health are ranked no. 13, and the rehabilitation counseling program within the School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences is no. 18 (tie). Among public universities, Pitt's graduate programs in education, engineering, and business are all ranked in the top 25. The School of Education is ranked no. 17 among public universities and no. 27 overall (tie); the Swanson School of Engineering is no. 24 among public universities and no. 43 overall (tie); and the Joseph M. Katz Graduate School of Business is No. 23 among public universities and No. 48 overall (tie). The School of Law advanced three spots to no. 78 overall (tie). It is ranked no. 42 among public universities. Individual departments within the Swanson School of Engineering ranked as follows: Bioengineering: 7 among publics, 16 overall (tie) Chemical and Petroleum: 24 among publics, 39 overall (tie) Civil Engineering: 35 among publics, 53 overall (tie) Computer Engineering: 30 among publics, 54 overall (tie) Electrical Engineering: 30 among publics, 52 overall (tie) Industrial Engineering: 15 among publics, 22 overall (tie) Materials Science: 35 among publics, 53 overall (tie)   ###  
Cara Masset
Jan
30
2015

Three Pitt faculty named 2015 Carnegie Science Award winners

All SSoE News, Bioengineering, Chemical & Petroleum

PITTSBURGH, Jan. 29, 2015- Three University of Pittsburgh faculty were among the winners of the 2015 Carnegie Science Awards, presented by Eaton, announced yesterday by the Carnegie Science Center. The program honors awardees from more than 15 categories, including Corporate Innovation, Emerging Female Scientist, Entrepreneur, and Leadership in STEM Education. These individuals and companies have distinguished themselves by making unparalleled contributions to science and technology in various disciplines. "The Carnegie Science Awards spotlight some of the most innovative minds today," said Ron Baillie, Henry Buhl, Jr., Co-Director of Carnegie Science Center. "These individuals are making a global impact starting with our own region. We know they are already inspiring a new generation of leaders." The Pitt awardees are: Advanced Materials Award Steven R. Little, PhD Associate Professor, CNG Faculty Fellow and Chair, Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering Secondary Appointments: Bioengineering, Immunology, Ophthalmology littlelab.pitt.edu Life Sciences Award Yadong Wang, PhD William Kepler Whiteford Professor of Bioengineering Secondary Appointments: Chemical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, and Surgery biomaterialsfoundry.pitt.edu Catalyst Award Rory A. Cooper, PhD FISA/PVA Endowed Chair and Distinguished Professor of the Department of Rehabilitation Science and Technology, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Secondary appointments: Bioengineering and Mechanical Engineering Director, Human Engineering Research Laboratories herl.pitt.edu Carnegie Science Center established the Carnegie Science Awards program in 1997 to recognize and promote outstanding science and technology achievements in western Pennsylvania. Celebrating its 19 th year, Carnegie Science Awards have honored the accomplishments of more than 400 individuals and organizations that have improved lives through their commitment and contributions in science and technology. "One of our central missions is to promote education in science, technology, engineering, and math - or STEM," said Ann Metzger, Henry Buhl, Jr., Co-Director of Carnegie Science Center. "The Carnegie Science Awards winners exemplify the highest levels of success in STEM fields and in STEM education. We are proud to recognize these outstanding awardees and look forward to their continued contributions." Eaton has supported Carnegie Science Awards for more than a decade as presenting sponsor. Chevron is the Awards' prime sponsor, and Kennametal is associate sponsor. "Eaton is proud to be a part of this vibrant community of science leaders and educators who continue to help position our region among the foremost technology and energy innovation centers in the world," said Ruppert Russoniello, president, Circuit Protection Division, Eaton, and Carnegie Science Awards Event Chair. "These awardees are helping us to build a future that promises to be healthier, smarter, and more prosperous for us all, which is why we offer our congratulations and our thanks." Awardees will be honored during a formal celebration at Carnegie Music Hall in Oakland on Friday, May 8, 2015. Three student winners, who will be selected at the Science Center's 76th annual Pittsburgh Regional Science & Engineering Fair, also will be recognized. WINNERS: Advanced Manufacturing - Michael Podobnik, Teletrix Corporation Advanced Materials - Steven R. Little, PhD, University of Pittsburgh Swanson School of Engineering Catalyst - Rory A. Cooper, PhD, Human Engineering Research Laboratories Corporate Innovation - Aesynt Elementary Educator - Jenna Whitney, South Allegheny Elementary School Middle Level Educator - Julie Allison, Beaver Area School District High School Educator - Graig Marx, Winchester Thurston School Leadership in STEM Education - Marijke Hecht, Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy University / Post-SecondaryEducator - David Brumley, PhD, Carnegie Mellon University, CyLab University / Post-SecondaryStudent - Danielle Chirdon, Carnegie Mellon University Emerging Female Scientist - Shirley Ho, PhD, Carnegie Mellon University, Department of Physics Start-Up Entrepreneur - Ananya Cleetus, Magikstra / Upper St. Clair High School Entrepreneur - Jesse Schell, Schell Games Environmental - Jeanne M. VanBriesen, PhD, PE, Carnegie Mellon University, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Information Technology - Luis von Ahn, PhD, Duolingo Life Sciences - Yadong Wang, PhD, University of Pittsburgh Swanson School of Engineering Science Communicator - Kathleen Knauer, The Allegheny Front   HONORABLE MENTIONS: Corporate Innovation - Rhiza, Inc. Elementary Educator - Michele Thomas, Kiski Area School District High School Educator - Volunteer Advisors of the Seneca Valley High School, Seneca Valley School District Leadership in STEM Education- David Brumley, Carnegie Mellon University, CyLab University Student - Sarah Kochanek, Duquesne University Emerging Female Scientist - Fabrisia Ambrosio, PhD, University of Pittsburgh, Dept. of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Start-Up Entrepreneur - Robb Myer, NoWait Entrepreneur - Susan & Eric Koger, ModCloth Environmental - Ronald Gdovic, WindStax Wind Power Systems   For more information about Carnegie Science Awards, visit CarnegieScienceCenter.org .   About Carnegie Science Center Carnegie Science Center is dedicated to inspiring learning and curiosity by connecting science and technology with everyday life. By making science both relevant and fun, the Science Center's goal is to increase science literacy in the region and motivate young people to seek careers in science and technology. One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, the Science Center is Pittsburgh's premier science exploration destination, reaching more than 700,000 people annually through its hands-on exhibits, camps, classes, and off-site education programs. About Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh Founded by Andrew Carnegie in 1895, Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh is a collection of four distinctive museums dedicated to exploration through art and science: Carnegie Museum of Art, Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Carnegie Science Center, and The Andy Warhol Museum. Annually, the museums reach more than 1.2 million people through exhibitions, educational programs, outreach activities, and special events. ###

Jan
26
2015

Swanson School announces 2015 roster of Distinguished Alumni

All SSoE News, Bioengineering, Chemical & Petroleum, Civil & Environmental, Electrical & Computer, Industrial, MEMS

PITTSBURGH (January 26, 2015) … Seven alumni who have made an impact across public, private and government sectors will be recognized by the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering with the 51 st Annual Distinguished Alumni Awards. The award honors those Pitt alumni who have made a positive contribution within their respective fields across the School's six engineering departments. In addition, one individual who was previously selected as a department awardee will be recognized as the overall Swanson School awardee. The awards will be presented at the Swanson School's Distinguished Alumni Banquet on Thursday, March 26 at Pitt's Alumni Hall. "On behalf of the Swanson School we're proud to recognize these seven individuals who have excelled within their discipline and are exemplary ambassadors of Pitt engineering," noted Gerald D. Holder, PhD, U.S. Steel Dean of Engineering. "I look forward to welcoming them back to campus and celebrating their achievements." This year's recipients are: Swanson School of Engineering Distinguished Alumnus Leonard K. Peters, BsChE '62, MSChE '69, PhD '71 Secretary of Energy and Environmental Cabinet, Commonwealth of Kentucky Bioengineering Fernando Aguel BSBioE '00, MSBioE '04 Branch Chief of the Circulatory Support Devices Branch, United States Food and Drug Administration  Civil and Environmental Engineering John D. Bossler, PhD, BSCE '59 Retired, Professor and Director of the Center for Mapping, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Geodetic Studies, Ohio State University Chemical and Petroleum Engineering Michael J. Fetkovich, DSc, BSPet '54 Phillips Fellow Emeritus, Phillips Petroleum Co. Sr. Principal Reservoir Engineer Member of the National Academy of Engineering Electrical and Computer Engineering Jeffrey M. Platt, BSEE '79  President and CEO, Tidewater, Inc. Industrial Engineering David M. Dunahay, BSIE '78 Founding president (retired), FAW-GM Light Duty Commercial Vehicle Co. in Changchun, China; and Adjunct Professor of International Business, Georgetown University Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science Albert J. Neupaver, MSME '79, MBA '82 Executive Chairman, Westinghouse Air Brake Technologies Corporation   ###  

Jan
22
2015

Pitt researchers find link between CO2 recycling catalysts and biomolecular enzymes

All SSoE News, Chemical & Petroleum

PITTSBURGH (January 22, 2015) … Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering have identified a promising design principle for renewable energy catalysts. Utilizing advanced computational modeling, researchers found that chemicals commonly found in laboratories may play a similar role as biological catalysts that nature uses for efficient energy storage. The article, " Thermodynamic Descriptors for Molecules That Catalyze Efficient CO2  Electroreductions " published online on January 20, 2015 in the journal ACS Catalysis , was authored by John A. Keith, PhD , assistant professor and Richard King Mellon Faculty Fellow in Energy in the Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, and Aude Marjolin, PhD, a postdoctoral fellow. According to Dr. Keith, the research examined thermodynamic energetics of molecules known as aromatic N-heterocycles (ANH), which earlier studies have shown help make CO 2 recycling more energetically efficient. "Sustainable fuels research is immensely challenging because not only do we need to understand how to convert waste molecules like CO 2 into something useful, like a fuel, we also need to make the overall process not too expensive or energy-intensive," Dr. Keith explained. Several studies over the past decade have found that common ANH molecules like pyridinium and imidazolium make CO 2 recycling processes much more efficient, but it has been unclear how ANH molecules do this. Dr. Keith's quantum chemistry analysis, completed at Pitt's Center for Simulation and Modeling (SaM), found that the same experimental conditions used to transform CO 2 are also suitable to transform ANH molecules into new molecules that possess a strikingly similar chemical structure as some well-known biomolecules. Coincidentally, nature uses these biomolecules for efficient energy storage processes. "Instead of searching for the answer to one question, this chemistry is presenting us with one answer to multiple questions." The results allow computational scientists like Dr. Keith to now screen hundreds to thousands of molecules a week on Pitt's SaM cluster, saving time and resources of others developing CO 2 recycling catalysts. New investigations can also branch out to identify other molecules that might be able to play a similar role in other green chemical processes, such as efficient water splitting for renewable hydrogen generation or other energetically efficient routes to produce commodity chemicals in a more sustainable manner. About the Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering The Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering serves undergraduate and graduate engineering students, the University and our industry, through education, research, and participation in professional organizations and regional/national initiatives. Our commitment to the future of the chemical process industry drives the development of educational and research programs. The Department has a tradition of excellence in education and research, evidenced by recent national awards including numerous NSF CAREER Awards, a Beckman Young Investigator Award, an NIH Director's New Innovator Award, and the DOE Hydrogen Program R&D Award, among others. Active areas of research in the Department include Biological and Biomedical Systems; Energy and Sustainability; and Materials Modeling and Design. The faculty has a record of success in obtaining research funding such that the Department ranks within the top 25 U.S. ChE departments for Federal R&D spending in recent years with annual research expenditures exceeding $7 million. The vibrant research culture within the Department includes active collaboration with the adjacent University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, the Center for Simulation and Modeling, the McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, the Mascaro Center for Sustainable Innovation, the Petersen Institute of NanoScience and Engineering and the U.S. DOE-affiliated Institute for Advanced Energy Solutions.  ###  

Jan
22
2015

Renowned tissue engineering researcher Kristi Anseth from University of Colorado named 2015 Bayer Distinguished Lecturer at Pitt

All SSoE News, Chemical & Petroleum

PITTSBURGH (January 22, 2015) … The Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering has named Kristi S. Anseth, PhD as recipient of the 2015 Bayer Distinguished Lectureship. Dr. Anseth is the Tisone Distinguished Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Associate Professor of Surgery, and Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator at the University of Colorado-Boulder Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, and a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies, the National Academy of Engineering, and the National Academy of Sciences.  The Bayer Distinguished Lectureship is presented annually by the Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, and recognizes outstanding excellence in chemical education, outreach and research. The lecture is sponsored by Bayer MaterialScience. Dr. Anseth will present lectures on Thursday, April 23 at 5:00 pm with a reception following, and Friday, April 24 at 9:30 am. Both lectures will be presented in Benedum Hall Room 102, 3700 O'Hara Street. Parking is limited. For more information email che@engr.pitt.edu or call 412-624-9630. "Dr. Anseth is one of the elite researchers bridging biology, chemistry and engineering, and our department is honored that she would accept this award," noted Steven R. Little, PhD, CNG Faculty Fellow and chair of the Swanson School's Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering. "Her research is helping to advance the fields of biomaterials and tissue engineering, especially with regard to medical applications such as artificial valves and cartilage. We look forward to hearing her presentations." Dr. Anseth earned her B.S. from Purdue University in the lab of noted researcher Nicholas A. Peppas, and PhD from the University of Colorado under the direction of Christopher Bowman. Her primary research is the design of synthetic hydrogel biomaterials that replicate the extracellular matrix surrounding living cells, creating scaffolds for the growth of new tissue. In 1999, she was named to the MIT Technology Review TR100 as one of the top 100 innovators in the world under the age of 35. She has filed for 18 patents, and published more than 250 research articles, and in 2003, she and her students were the first to successfully develop an injectable and biodegradable scaffold to regenerate cartilage. She was first engineer selected as a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator, which includes 17 Nobel laureates and 172 members of the National Academy of Sciences. Her other awards include the Hazel Barnes Award, University of Colorado (2013); Mid-Career Research Award, Materials Research Society (2012); Distinguished Engineering Alumni Award, Purdue University (2012); Distinguished Research Lecturer, University of Colorado (2011);   Professional Progress Award, American Institute of Chemical Engineers (2009); named one of the 'Brilliant 10' Scientists by Popular Science (2008) and one of the "One Hundred Chemical Engineers of the Modern Era," by AIChE (2008); Distinguished Engineering Alumni Award, Research and Teaching, University of Colorado (2008); Clemson Award for Basic Research, Society for Biomaterials (2008); Alan T. Waterman Award, National Science Foundation (2004);  Allan P. Colburn Award, American Institute of Chemical Engineers (2003); Curtis W. McGraw Award, American Society for Engineering Education (2003); and the David and Lucile Packard Fellowship for Science and Engineering (1997). About Bayer MaterialScience Bayer is a global enterprise with core competencies in the fields of health care, agriculture and high-tech materials. As an innovation company, it sets trends in research-intensive areas. Bayer's products and services are designed to benefit people and improve the quality of life. At the same time, the Group aims to create value through innovation, growth and high earning power. Bayer is committed to the principles of sustainable development and acts as a socially and ethically responsible corporate citizen. In fiscal year 2012, Bayer employed 110,500 people and had sales of €39.8 billion ($51.9 billion). Capital expenditures amounted to €2 billion ($2.6 billion), R&D expenses to €3 billion ($3.9 billion).  Bayer MaterialScience is a Bayer Group company. With 2012 sales of €11.5 billion ($15 billion), Bayer MaterialScience is among the world's largest polymer companies. Business activities are focused on the manufacture of high-tech polymer materials and the development of innovative solutions for products used in many areas of daily life. The main segments served are the automotive, electrical and electronics, construction and sports and leisure industries. Bayer MaterialScience has 30 production sites around the globe and employed approximately 14,500 people at the end of 2012. About the Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering The Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering serves undergraduate and graduate engineering students, the University and our industry, through education, research, and participation in professional organizations and regional/national initiatives. Our commitment to the future of the chemical process industry drives the development of educational and research programs. The Department has a tradition of excellence in education and research, evidenced by recent national awards including numerous NSF CAREER Awards, a Beckman Young Investigator Award, an NIH Director's New Innovator Award, and the DOE Hydrogen Program R&D Award, among others. Active areas of research in the Department include Biological and Biomedical Systems; Energy and Sustainability; and Materials Modeling and Design. The faculty has a record of success in obtaining research funding such that the Department ranks within the top 25 U.S. ChE departments for Federal R&D spending in recent years with annual research expenditures exceeding $7 million. The vibrant research culture within the Department includes active collaboration with the adjacent University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, the Center for Simulation and Modeling, the McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, the Mascaro Center for Sustainable Innovation, the Petersen Institute of NanoScience and Engineering and the U.S. DOE-affiliated Institute for Advanced Energy Solutions. About the Swanson School of Engineering   The University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering is one of the oldest engineering programs in the United States and is consistently ranked among the top 50 engineering programs nationally. The Swanson School has excelled in basic and applied research during the past decade and is on the forefront of 21st century technology including sustainability, energy systems, bioengineering, micro- and nanosystems, computational modeling, and advanced materials development. Approximately 120 faculty members serve more than 2,600 undergraduate and graduate students and Ph.D. candidates in six departments, including Bioengineering, Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Industrial Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Materials Science.   ###  

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