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The Graduate Program in Construction Management prepares students to manage the rebuilding of  public infrastructure and the modernization of  private buildings and plants. The program takes an integrated and comprehensive approach to construction management which encompasses both public and private sector perspectives, both building and engineering construction, and the roles played by all the participants on the construction team (owners, contractors, design professionals, and other supporting professionals). The program emphasizes managerial decision-making in an engineering context. Graduates of the program will become leaders in the construction industry as they practice in public agencies, construction companies, consulting firms, and many other national and international positions.

The Construction Management is oriented toward the practitioner and is actively supported by members of the construction industry in terms of advice and participation. The adjunct faculties are highly qualified construction professionals who bring together the rare blend of academic excellence and practical application. The program teaches students those decision-making skills that are so important to the successful completion of construction projects as measured by time, cost, and quality objectives. In addition, the program develops in the students those professional qualities that will make them effective managers - communication skills, computer applications, ethical standards, and leadership attributes.

Graduate students in Construction Management pursue a professional Master of Science Civil and Environmental Engineering. The course of study has three components comprising ten courses and a master level special project. The program has specific required courses:

  • The required core component consists of five graduate level construction courses (15 credits).
  • The technical design component consists of three graduate level engineering electives (9 credits).
  • 9 credits CEE 2XXX or 3XXX courses (i.e. three elective courses) in related areas, with approval of the advisor
  • The managerial component consists of two graduate level management electives (6 credits).
  • The individual project gives the student the opportunity to develop an application of the material learned in the courses.
  • Students must have a final grade point average of 3.00 or higher to be awarded their degree.

Find out the associated courses for Construction Management.  

Construction Management Thesis Option Requirements

This option includes 24 semester course credits (as described above) plus a 6-credit thesis.

The Environmental Engineering Program at the University of Pittsburgh provides opportunities for graduate education and research in the science and engineering of water and wastewater treatment, water quality, solid and hazardous waste management, air quality control and environmental impact assessment at the MS level. The program has attained national and international prominence, with faculty serving on important governmental advisory committees as well as leading offices of major environmental education and professional societies. Graduates of the program are in great demand by consulting firms and government agencies and by research organizations and educational institutions. Students have unique opportunities for collaboration with engineering faculty as well as other professionals in public health, medicine, chemical and mechanical engineering, business and law. Students also may gain access to world-class general-use analytical and instrumentation facilities to support their academic interests.

The program is administered by a multidisciplinary faculty, with the participation of practicing professionals from both the public and private sectors. Research sponsors include the National Science Foundation, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Department of Energy, Electric Power Research Institute, U.S. Department of Interior, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, state agencies and industry.

Students can enter the program with a variety of training and backgrounds in all areas of engineering, economics, mathematics and management. Students can select a wide variety of courses in transportation, urban systems, industrial engineering, and management.

Master of Science Degree (Thesis Option)

The Master of Science degrees in Civil and Environmental Engineering are primarily designed for students with an undergraduate degree in engineering, although students with other backgrounds can be accommodated with specially designed programs. An MS degree can be pursued by a full-time or part-time student by completing 24 semester course credits plus a 6-credit thesis.

Graduates of the environmental engineering program are involved in a wide range of professional endeavors ranging from the design and development of treatment systems, to environmental assessments and regulatory activities. In recognition of unique interests of our students, the courses are selected after consultations with the faculty advisor. However, all graduates are required to complete the following program courses:

  • CEE 2500 "Environmental Engineering Biology"
  • CEE 2501 "Environmental Engineering Chemistry"
  • CEE 3501 "Environmental Engineering Processes-I"
  • CEE 3502 "Environmental Engineering Processes-II"

Students supported as graduate research assistants and all students intending to continue for a Ph.D. degree are required to pursue the thesis option.

The graduate program in Geotechnical and Pavements Engineering focuses on the characterization and utilization of natural materials for civil engineering construction. Historically, the geotechnical engineering program focused on structural foundations, slope stability, and earth dams. Today, the program's scope of activities has expanded to include natural and man made hazard mitigation, advanced techniques for site and material characterization, constitutive modeling of natural materials, design of pavement systems, and geo-environmental assessment and remediation.

The Geotechnical and Pavements Engineering program prepares students for careers in consulting practice, construction, research and teaching. The faculty offers a broad and varied background, rich in long term practical experience and strong in theoretical mechanics and experimental modeling of geo-materials and pavements. Four faculty members in the group provide the diversity that enables a comprehensive course curriculum and a wide range of research opportunities to be offered to incoming undergraduate and graduate students.

The specific course requirements and associated courses for each program are as follows:

Master of Science Degree - Thesis Option

30 credits required as follows:

  • CEE 2800 - Engineering Geology (3 credits)
  • CEE 2801 - Advanced Soil Mechanics (3 credits)
  • CEE 2802 - Geotechnical Analysis (3 credits)
  • CEE 2814 - Slope Stability (3 credits)
  • 3 additional credits from CEE 38XX level course in Geotechnical Engineering
  • 9 credits CEE 2XXX or 3XXX courses 3 (i.e. three elective courses) in related areas, with approval of the Advisor
  • 6 thesis credits CEE 2999 :

The students can also take an independent study course CEE 2996 ; however they have to write a report from the results of the independent study to give the grade. The rest of the courses could be any from the Civil Engineering Program or from other departments with the approval of the Adviser.

The thesis option requires passing an oral Comprehensive Examination, based upon the completed graduate course work, and an oral defense as well as written documentation of the Thesis. The Comprehensive Examination may be oral and combined with the final oral defense of the Thesis work. The Masters degrees are conferred only on those who have completed all course requirements with at least 3.0 QPA.

Students with a Teaching Assistantship or Research Assistantship must write a thesis.

Master of Science Degree in Civil Engineering - Pavements Engineering Requirements

30 credits required as follows:

  • CEE 2714 : Pavement Design (3 credits)
  • CEE 2715 : Pavement Rehabilitation (3 credits)
  • CEE 2717 : Properties of Concrete or CEE 2718 : Advanced Bituminous Materials (3 credits)
  • CEE 3714 : Advanced Pavement Design (3 credits)
  • 6 additional credits either from CEE 23XX (structure courses) or from CEE 28XX (Geotechnical Courses) with approval of the Advisor
  • 6 credits CEE 2XXX or 3XXX courses 5 (i.e. two elective courses) in related areas, with approval of the Advisor
  • 6 credits CEE 2999 MS Thesis

5 The students can also take an independent study course CEE 2996 ; however they have to write a report from the results of the independent study to give the grade. The rest of the courses could be any from the Civil Engineering Program or from other departments with the approval of the Adviser.

The thesis option requires passing an oral Comprehensive Examination, based upon the completed graduate course work, and an oral defense as well as written documentation of the Thesis. The Comprehensive Examination may be oral and combined with the final oral defense of the Thesis work. The Masters degrees are conferred only on those who have completed all course requirements with at least 3.0 QPA.

Pittsburgh's location at the confluence of three major rivers, combined with a topography of hills and valleys, has led to a profusion of bridges (second in the world only to Venice) of every type and description and to a structural heritage unequaled in any other US city. From Roebling's first vehicular suspension bridge (1845) and Lindenthal's double lenticular trusses (1883 and still in service) to the modern tied arches of the interstate highway system, Pittsburgh enjoys the distinction of being a "living" structural laboratory. The graduate research and education programs in Structural Engineering and Mechanics at the University of Pittsburgh reflect this emphasis.

The graduate program in Structural Engineering and Mechanics prepares students for careers in consulting practice, construction and fabrication, research and teaching. The program is equally strong in applications in structural steel, reinforced and prestressed concrete and composite structures design, computer methods of analysis, laboratory and field testing, structural dynamics and earthquake and wind, structural safety and stochastic processes and building and bridge design. Faculty is very active, nationally and internationally, in research, code committees, professional associations and consulting.

The SEM graduate program is intended to develop the following set of core competencies:

  • Proficiency in fundamental mechanics and analytic methods used in Structural Engineering including structural dynamics.
  • Proficiency in of fundamental skills required to conduct finite element modeling.
  • Proficiency in advanced design skills which incorporate full-structure design/behavior.
  • Proficiency in of code-based design skills.
  • Ability to work independently and in teams to solve ill-defined problems of structural engineering

These competencies are in addition to the objectives of an ABET-accredited undergraduate program.

Master of Science in Civil Engineering - Thesis Option

The MSCE program recognizes the need for developing advanced engineering competencies reflecting the growing trend of considering the MSCE as the so-called "first professional degree". In the field of Structural Engineering, in particular, the need for advanced competency is reflected in the adoption of the SE license (as different from the PE). The objective therefore is to develop in students advanced competencies required to work as a Structural Engineer.

Masters of Science Program

The MSCE program is a 30 credit program having the following requirements:

Thesis

Required Core Courses

  • 3 credits: CEE 2333 Introduction to Finite Element Analysis or equivalent
  • 3 credits: CEE 2320 Advanced Mechanics of Materials or equivalent
  • 3 credits: SEM Graduate Design Elective (see list below) or course having substantial engineering design component
  • 6 credits: SEM Graduate Technical Electives or Design Electives 1 (see lists below)

Graduate Technical Electives

  • 9 credits: graduate technical elective credits may be taken from any engineering, science or math department with academic advisor's approval. Typically SEM courses will be used to satisfy some of this requirement. 

Note: 1CEE 2330 Advanced Structural Analysis may not be taken for graduate credit if the student's undergraduate program includes an equivalent course.

Course Listings and Other Information

SEM Graduate Design Electives:

  • CEE 2340 Design of Concrete Structures II
  • CEE 2341 Design of Steel Structures II
  • CEE 2343 Prestressed Concrete
  • CEE 2344 Design of Masonry Structures
  • CEE 2346 Repair and retrofit of Structures
  • CEE 2370 Introduction to NDT and SHM
  • CEE 3361 Wind and Seismic Design of High Rise Structures

 SEM Graduate Technical Electives:

Additionally, Mechanical Engineering (ME) and Material Science (MSE) courses may be used to fulfill Technical Elective requirements with the consent of the student's advisor.

Required Mathematics Course:

  • ME 2001 Differential Equations (preferred course)
  • Any 2000 level Mathematics course (pre requisites for these course must also be satisfied)
  • MATH 1070, 1080, 1100, 1110, 1180, 1240, 1270, 1280, 1350, 1360, 1370, 1470, 1480, 1530, 1540, 1550, 1560 and 1570

Applicants not having a Civil Engineering Undergraduate Degree

Students entering the SEM program are required to have taken the following undergraduate courses, or their equivalent:

Deficiencies in these courses (and their prerequisites) must be addressed by passing the appropriate undergraduate course with a grade of B or better. CEE 2330 Advanced Structural Analysis may be taken for graduate credit. 

Requirements described in this document are subject to revision.

The Sustainable Engineering (SE) group at the University of Pittsburgh is the next generation of interdisciplinary education and research in environmental and sustainability engineering and green design. SE brings together forward-thinking and enthusiastic faculty with experience in coordinated interdisciplinary approaches towards research, education, and outreach.

The program in Sustainable Engineering addresses some of the most pressing concerns of the 21st century. We involve students in a comprehensive course of graduate study that addresses the multifaceted issues and challenges in sustainability. Education and research which cut across multiple disciplines is emphasized so that students learn innovative approaches to understanding and providing solutions to complex issues faced by today's society. The flexible and collaborative nature of the program allows students to focus on problems of interest to them, while drawing upon relevant knowledge from a variety of disciplines.

Graduates emerge from SE with a novel perspective and cutting edge skills directed towards environmental stewardship and sustainability. The graduate program in SE prepares students for leadership roles in sustainability engineering practice, development and research. Students have unique opportunities to participate in national and international conferences and events, network with leaders in industry, government, and research, and collaborate with engineering faculty as well as other professionals. Graduates from our program are well equipped for careers in consultancy, education, research, local, state, and federal government, non-governmental organizations, industry, utilities, regulatory agencies, and many more.

Masters Program (Thesis Option)

The Master of Science degrees in Civil and Environmental Engineering are primarily designed for students with an undergraduate degree in engineering, although students with other backgrounds can be accommodated with specially designed programs. An MS degree can be pursued by a full-time or part-time student through the Thesis Option. This option includes 24 semester course credit hours plus a 6-credit thesis.

Students supported as graduate research assistants or teaching assistants and all students intending to continue for a Ph.D. degree are required to pursue the thesis option. All other students may elect to pursue either option, following consultation with the faculty advisor.

This Thesis option requires a written thesis and the passing of an oral defense of the thesis or project, respectively. At the discretion of the MS committee, a student may also be required to pass a written comprehensive examination. Masters students who elect the thesis option are required to have submitted at least one publishable paper, journal article, or peer reviewed entry in conference proceedings prior to their oral defense. 

*Requirements described above are subject to revision and changes over time.

The Graduate Program in Transportation Engineering in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh focuses on the fundamentals of transportation systems and operation analysis, as well as enhancing the students analytical, quantitative, and communication skills to prepare them for the challenges of the profession.

We have a rigorous and quantitative approach to transportation problems with a strong emphasis on computer applications. Although our program does not focus on any particular mode of transportation, our students gain the knowledge and skills necessary to analyze all modes of transportation for the movement of people and goods in both the public and private sectors.

Students can enter the program with a variety of training and backgrounds in all areas of engineering, economics, mathematics and management. They can select a wide variety of courses. The Transportation Engineering Program consists of a balanced curriculum with the following three focus areas: planning, design and operations. A sufficient selection of courses is offered so the program can be completed within two years. These courses will be offered at times that will help to accommodate the schedules of both the full-time and part-time students.

This program is designed to help meet the workforce development needs of the transportation engineering industry. The University of Pittsburgh is particularly well positioned to help meet these workforce development needs through this program. Some of the school's specific strengths include:

  • A core of tenure track faculty in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering that have strong interest in the transportation engineering field.
  • Access to a large pool of senior transportation engineers in the Western Pennsylvania public and private sector (many of whom are alumni) that can serve as adjunct professors to teach courses in the program.
  • Development of a cohesive curriculum from the core civil engineering fields and related areas, such as construction management, public policy and management, geographic information systems, and statistics. Experience delivering course-only Master of Science degrees tailored for professional engineers, such as Construction Management and Sustainability program, which is highly regarded by industry.

Minimum Requirements

The Master of Science in Civil Engineering (Thesis Option) in Transportation Engineering is offered for full-time and part-time students and requires 24 course credits plus 6 thesis credits.

This option requires passing a Comprehensive Examination, based upon the completed graduate course work and an oral defense as well as written documentation of the Thesis. The Comprehensive Examination may be oral and combined with the final oral defense. The Master of Science degrees are conferred only on those who have completed all course requirements with at least 3.0 QPA. 

 

The Professional MS Program requires 30 course credits with at a least a 3.0 QPA.

Students seeking admission to the Program without an undergraduate engineering degree or equivalent from an accredited engineering school are required to make up any deficiencies in the areas of civil engineering, mathematics, economics, and statistics before full graduate status is recognized. Remedial courses in these areas do not count as part of the degree credit requirements. 

 

The Transportation Engineering Program is based on the following three focus areas: planning, design and operations. In addition, a project development course, which will utilize the three focus areas to plan, design and put into operation a transportation project, is required. The following five core courses are required for all students: 

Operation: CEE 2700 - Transportation Management and Operations (3 credits)
  CEE 2710 - Traffic Control Systems (3 credits)
Planning: CEE 2720 - Urban Transportation Planning (3 credits)
Design: CEE 2714 - Pavement Design (3 credits) or
  CEE 2730 - Highway Engineering (3 credits)
Focus Integration:  CEE 2750 - Transportation Project Development

 

The remaining courses will consist of electives that must be approved by the Academic Advisor. A maximum of nine credits of graduate technical electives from outside the CEE Department are allowed with approval of the Academic Advisor.

The following is a list of available relevant courses:

Civil and Environmental Engineering Courses

  • CEE 2105 - Advanced Civil Engineering Materials
  • CEE 3714 - Pavement Design and Analysis II
  • CEE 2711 - ITS Operation and Design
  • CEE 2715 - Pavement Rehabilitation
  • CEE 2717 - Components, Properties and Design of Portland cement Concrete
  • CEE 2718 - Advanced Construction Bituminous
  • CEE 2725 - Public Transportation Systems

Relevant Non-Civil and Environmental Engineering Courses

Graduate School of Public and International Affairs (GSPIA)

  • MPPM 2008 Economics for Public Affairs
  • MPPM 2010 Public Management (offered in spring)
  • MPPM 2000 Administration of Public Affairs
  • MPPM 2125 City and Regional Theory and Practice

For additional courses offered by GSPIA you can check out the following website: http://www.gspia.pitt.edu/Academics/CourseInformation/tabid/107/Default.aspx  

Engineering

Statistics

  • BIOST 3023: Geographic Information Systems & Spatial Data Analysis
  • BIOST 2041: Introduction to Statistical Methods 1
  • BIOST 2042: Introduction to Statistical Methods 2
  • BIOST 2035: Experimental Design
  • BIOST 2049: Applied Regression Analysis
  • BIOST 2052: Multivariate Analysis
  • IE 2005 : Statistics for Engineers 1
  • IE 2007 : Statistics for Engineers 2
  • IE 2073 : Design of Experiments
  • IE 2084 : Stochastic Processes
  • IE 2034 : Neural Networks and Industrial Applications
  • IE 2070 : Regression and Analysis of Variance

The graduate program in Water Resources (WR) Engineering at Pitt emphasizes studies of the fundamental processes that govern the movement of water in the natural environment and eco-systems. This includes studies of the surface and subsurface water flows, the interaction of water and sediments to produce morphological changes for engineering and geological time scales, soil-vegetation-land-atmosphere interactions, management of water resource systems, climate change and variability and their impacts on water and energy cycles and on water resources, and the interactions of these and other topics. Students are encouraged to develop a broad set of problem-solving skills through courses and research in related fields and through interdisciplinary research. Currently, faculty at the WR program has established collaboration with faculty at other departments such as Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences, Dept. of Geology, Dept. of Geography, among others.

Master Science in Civil Engineering - Thesis Option

The education goal of the WR Engineering program is to provide the training needed to address current and future hydrological, environmental, and water resources issues.  Through rigorous requirements on course work and research projects, the WR program expects students to develop advanced technical skills and basic research capabilities required to work as a hydrologist, or a hydraulic and water resources engineer.  This option includes 24 credits of course and 6 credit hours of thesis research.

The core competencies of the WR program include:  

  • Demonstrated proficiency in fundamental and advanced theories and processes of hydrodynamics, hydrology and water resources engineering, and their applications to hydraulic, hydrological, environmental, and water resources engineering. 
  • Demonstrated ability to think critically.    
  • Demonstrated ability to work independently and in teams to solve practical/real world problems. 

These competencies are in addition to the objectives of an ABET-accredited undergraduate program. 

Masters students who are supported by either a RA or TA or any other forms of fellowship and scholarship must write a thesis.  Masters students who write a thesis must demonstrate a mastery of a particular topic and/or field.  While new knowledge or contribution to a field is not required in a MS thesis, it is expected (not required) that an MS thesis would result in a conference or journal article.